Chinese medicine

醫學、商業與社會想像:日治臺灣的漢藥科學化與科學中藥

Author Info
Shiyung Michael Liu
Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History & RCHSS, Academia Sinica

The study ofpharmacognosy started in the late 19th century Japan and boomed in the 1920s while the Renaissance Movement of Chinese medicine (Ko-kan Ido) was ignited. The complicated relationship between therapeutic theory and herbal drugs of Chinese medicine dated centuries while they co-existed in Japan but conflicted in colonial Taiwan. In Japan, traditional herb could be analyzed in laboratory coating with the color of “science” for marketing.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 11 (October 2010), 149-200

The Enigma Concerning Dr. Tsungming Tu’s Research in Traditional East Asian Medicine: On the Creation of Value in Integrative Medicine

Author Info
Sean Hsiang-lin Lei
Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica TAIWAN and Institute of Science, Technology and Society, Yangming University

This article intends to solve a pair of salient enigmas in the history of medicine in modern Taiwan: Why did Dr. Tsungming Tu, a widely acclaimed representative of medical modernity in Taiwan, provide consistent support to research in traditional East Asian medicine?  Reversely, why has Dr. Tu’s research vision long been criticized as backward-looking and even anti-science?  This article argues that Dr.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 11 (October 2010 ), 201 -286

The Demarcation and Context of Illness Interpretation in Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine in the Early Period of Republic of China: Taking Typhoid Fever as an Example

Author Info
Pi Guo-Li
Ph. D. Candidate, Department of History, National Taiwan Normal University

The exchange of traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine in modern times has produced many interesting issues in the history of medicine. This study examined the demarcation and context of illness interpretation in Chinese Medicine and Western medicine by reviewing the translation process of the name and meaning of an illness before and after it was translated.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 11 (October 2010), 25-88
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