Research Articles

The Call of Human Nature: Governmentality and Sexual Offence Prevention Policy in Taiwan

Author Info
Kevin Chien-Chang Wu
Department of Social Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine;Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and National Taiwan University Hospital

Since about ten years ago, in Taiwan, there have been booming legislative and administrative activities for female equality and protection. Sexual offence prevention policy is one the most important issues in the trend. Severe sexual crimes shocked society. Media abounds with reports and comments on sexual offenders. Statutes and regulations regarding sexual offence prevention have been revised frequently. Law governs people based on its understanding of human nature. The evolution of sexual offence prevention policy especially involves re-configuring sexual offenders' human nature.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 6 (April 2008), 69-110.

Visible AIDS v. Invisible AIDS "Patient": A Study on the Case of the Harmony Home Association delivered by the Taipei District

Author Info
Yu-Lin Chiang
College of Law, National Chengchi University

SinceOn October 11 2006, Taipei District Court ruled that the Harmony Home Association should move out from the Zaihsin Community. In order to solve the residence problems of HIV-infected people, the Legislative Yuan soon passed a new bill on June 14 2007 to manage the care, treatment and residence of HIV-infected people. Taiwan High Court then, on August 7 2007, overruled the original sentence and ordered that they could still stay in the Zaihsin Community.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 6 (April 2008), 111-144.

Between Voyeurism, Seduction, and Confrontation: Mary Ellen Mark's Ward 81

Author Info
Jui-Ch'i Liu
Center for General Education and the Graduate Institute of Sociology, National Tsing Hua University

Mary Ellen Mark (1940- ) is one of the most influential, contemporary photojournalists in the United States. In 1979, she published Ward 81, a study of severely ill women at Oregon State Mental Hospital. This article, based on visual analyses as well as some crucial literature, compares Mark's works with related works in the tradition of maledominated psychiatric photography. In so doing, I decode how Mark negotiates her female gaze on women's madness.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 4 (April 2007), 109-149

On the Ontology of Actor-Network Theory

Author Info
Wen-Yuan Lin
Center for General Education and the Graduate Institute of Sociology, National Tsing Hua University

Exploring the social characteristics of scientific knowledge and rationality has been an intrinsic problematic of science and technology studies (STS). After examining sociological studies of scientific communities and social studies of scientific knowledge, STS enquiries now have turned to the role of knowledge and knowing in the constitution of the known object. Among them, Actor-Network Theory (ANT) is an important approach. This paper first delineates this ontological turn of ANT: ontology-in-practice.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 4 (April 2007), 65-108

Bio-Capitalism: A Marxist Critique

Author Info
Chia-Huang Wang
Department of Sociology, Yuan-Ze University

This paper provides a critical review of contemporary bio-capitalism by means of a pure Marxian view and C. W. Mills's sociological imagination. First, the relationships between fetishism of commodity and commodification of life are discussed. Second, I critically describe the mechanism, structure, and process of bio-colonialism and bioenclosure, both of which involve patent practice. There is no complete solution to the domination and exploitation of bio-capitalism.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 4 (April 2007), 17-64.

Public Trust and Risk Perceptions: A Preliminary Study of Taiwan's GMOs, 2003-2004

Author Info
Chou Kuei Tien
Graduate Institute of National Development, National Taiwan University.

This paper mainly discusses public perceptions and attitudes towards genetically modified organism (GMO) disputes by comparing the results of two annual national telephone surveys. The themes of the surveys include risk perception, risk assessment, risk communication, public participation, and public trust, and they examined the public's attitudes towards general GMO knowledge, GMO policy, and GMO risk, as well as the government's ability to engage in GMO risk governance.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 4 (April 2007), 151-178

Controversies over Evolution Theory in the Science Monthly, 1970 2006

Author Info
Heng-An Chen
Department of History, National Cheng Kung University

Established in 1970, Science Monthly is the pioneering and longest-lived popular science magazine in Taiwan. This paper focuses on the articles in this publication that deal with the theory of evolution and its cultural and social influences. Articles published in the last thirty years were analyzed, leading to the identification of five major issues: the conflict between science and religion, how to translate "evolution" into Chinese, the history of biology as a new discipline, whether "the origin of species" has suffered an eclipse, and discussions around the book The Great Dying.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 5 (October 2007), 183-227.

The Evolution of Astronomical Thought before Kepler: Copernicus and Tycho Brahe

Author Info
Dong-Yuan Tai
The Center of Humanities Education, Providence University

This paper traces the evolutionary path of western astronomical thoughts from Copernicus to Kepler by utilizing the notion of theory version. Like the paradigm theory and research programme methodology, the theory of theory version is also a philosophical one, but it has a view of its own. Unlike other philosophical theories emphasizing why and how a grand scientific theory (a paradigm or a research programme) was accepted or rejected, theory version focuses on each individual scientist's own knowledge-claims and shows how these claims come to be accepted or rejected by successors.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 5 (October 2007), 111-182.

Risk Communication and Public Participation: A Case Study of Building Hsih-Chu's Science-based Industrial Park in I-lan

Author Info
Wen-Ling Tu, Li-Wen Shih, Ting-I Huang
Assistant professor, Department of Public Policy and Management, Shih Hsin University; Research assistant, Department of Sociology, National Taiwan University; Graduate student, Department of Public Policy and Management, Shih Hsin University

Public participation and risk communication have become important components in environmental decision-making processes. However, public opposition and mistrust during risk communication often cripple policy-making processes. This case study examines risk communications on high-tech environmental controversies in three public forums (an Environmental Impact Assessment public hearing, a social protest, and a citizens' conference). This paper argues that policy-makers' technocratic tendency prevents them from communicating effectively with the public about environmental risk.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 5 (October 2007), 71-110.

Discourses of Risk, Citizen Activism, and the Waste Facility Siting Controversy

Author Info
Mei-Fang Fan
Department of Public Administration & Institute of Public Policy

Regulation and risk management in Taiwan are dominated by technocracy. Although the Environmental Impact Assessment Law was approved in 1994 to regulate development projects and to standardize the criteria for its implementation, the lay public does not have much opportunity to participate in the process. Those residents who oppose siting waste facilities in their communities tend to be stigmatized as promoting self-interest and as being irrational and ignorant.

Citation: 
Taiwanese Journal for Studies of Science, Technology and Medicine, Number 5 (October 2007), 43-70.
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